Opportunities begin and thrive here.

A big part of what makes UCLA Samueli a fantastic place to become an engineer can be found right in our name: UCLA. One of the most well-known acronyms in higher education is well-known for a reason. Home to a thriving student scene complete with a full array of NCAA Division I sports (including a legendary basketball program), our vibrant campus is alive with opportunities – from nearly endless student clubs and organizations, to an incredibly diverse array of film screenings and art exhibitions, to world-class concerts and performing arts.

And that’s all without leaving campus. Once you do, you’ll find one of the world’s most diverse and energetic cities in Los Angeles. From our sprawling beaches and temperate climate, to an incredible diversity of restaurants and nightlife, to star-studded events you won’t find anywhere else, LA inspires you to dream big and succeed even bigger.

UCLA Samueli thrives in this incredible city, and we ensure that our students thrive as well. That’s why you’ll find student clubsresearch opportunities, inspirational speaker events, and a diversity of minds and people, all supported through health and wellness services dedicated to both students and faculty.

So if you’re ready to discover your passion for engineering within this vibrant city and campus, we invite you to visit our admissions page.

News

Hard to crack: UCLA engineers toughen glass using nanoparticles

Process could be useful for applications in manufacturing and architecture
UCLA mechanical engineers and materials scientists have developed a process that uses nanoparticles to strengthen the atomic structure of glass. The result is a product that’s at least five times tougher than any glass currently available.

UCLA engineers in the field after major California earthquakes

Q&A with Jonathan Stewart about what his team learned in the aftermath of the Ridgecrest quakes
A day after a magnitude 6.4 earthquake on July 4 rattled Southern California, a small team of earthquake engineers and scientists was already near its epicenter, in Ridgecrest, Calif., gathering time-sensitive data.

UCLA Engineering

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