Opportunities begin and thrive here.

A big part of what makes UCLA Samueli a fantastic place to become an engineer can be found right in our name: UCLA. One of the most well-known acronyms in higher education is well-known for a reason. Home to a thriving student scene complete with a full array of NCAA Division I sports (including a legendary basketball program), our vibrant campus is alive with opportunities – from nearly endless student clubs and organizations, to an incredibly diverse array of film screenings and art exhibitions, to world-class concerts and performing arts.

And that’s all without leaving campus. Once you do, you’ll find one of the world’s most diverse and energetic cities in Los Angeles. From our sprawling beaches and temperate climate, to an incredible diversity of restaurants and nightlife, to star-studded events you won’t find anywhere else, LA inspires you to dream big and succeed even bigger.

UCLA Samueli thrives in this incredible city, and we ensure that our students thrive as well. That’s why you’ll find student clubsresearch opportunities, inspirational speaker events, and a diversity of minds and people, all supported through health and wellness services dedicated to both students and faculty.

So if you’re ready to discover your passion for engineering within this vibrant city and campus, we invite you to visit our admissions page.


UCLA researchers develop a new class of two-dimensional materials

A research team led by UCLA scientists and engineers has developed a method to make new kinds of artificial “superlattices” — materials comprised of alternating layers of ultra-thin “two-dimensional” sheets, which are only one or a few atoms thick. Unlike current state-of-the art superlattices, in which

Mehta receives NSF CAREER Award to bring robots to everyone

Ankur Mehta, an assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering at the UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science, has received a National Science Foundation CAREER award, the agency’s highest honor for faculty members at the start of their research and teaching careers.