UCLA Samueli COVID-19 Information

This webpage is designed to answer frequently asked questions from students, faculty and staff at UCLA Samueli School of Engineering regarding the impacts of COVID-19. We will update the page as quickly as possible when new information becomes available. This page was last updated May 19, 2022.  For real-time updates from the university, please visit UCLA COVID-19 and vaccine resources.

University Status:

Q: How are classes being taught for the spring 2022 quarter?

A: The majority of classes are being held in-person for spring quarter 2022 with minimal exceptions.

Q: What are the COVID testing requirements for students, faculty, and staff?

A: Weekly surveillance testing will remain in place until further notice. However, in order to allow for a cautious and staggered approach to lifting mitigations and give public health experts an opportunity to measure the potential impacts of easing masking and other requirements at UCLA. It was previously announced that weekly surveillance testing was going to be lifted for students, faculty and staff who are up to date on their vaccinations on May 1, but this is no longer the case.

The following COVID testing requirements are in place until further notice:

Weekly surveillance testing

All students, faculty and staff working, learning or living on campus or surrounding properties must continue to test at least 1x per week from the campus vending machines or distribution centers (i.e., no more than seven days apart) regardless of vaccination status per the UCLA Community Screening Protocol (PDF). Testing 2x per week is strongly recommended.

As an additional precaution, starting May 9, students living on the Hill will be required to complete COVID-19 surveillance testing twice per week until further notice. Tests continue to be available at all on-campus housing front desks and campus vending machines. See UCLA Community Screening Protocol (PDF) for details. 

UCLA’s self-administered saliva-swab (PCR) tests kits are available from vending machines and distribution centers throughout campus.  Anyone with a BruinCard can obtain up to two free tests per week. (A smartphone or tablet that receives SMS texts is also required.)

Within an hour of collecting your sample, deposit it in a collection bin next to the vending machines — make sure to deposit it between 8 a.m. and 2 p.m. Monday–Friday (excluding holidays).

Results for samples received before 11 a.m. will be available within 24 to 36 hours; those received after 11 a.m. will have results within 48 hours.

If you can’t obtain a test from a vending machine or require in-person testing for any reason, visit the in-person testing site at 300 Bradley Hall.

For more information on testing, visit the UCLA Ashe Center’s COVID-19 testing site.

Q: What are the masking and symptom-monitoring survey requirements?

A: With a rise in cases since Spring Break, indoor masking is strongly urged and the symptom-monitoring survey will continue until further notice.

 Beginning April 11, indoor masking remains strongly recommended but is no longer required for students, faculty and staff who are up to date on their COVID-19 vaccinations.  This does not apply to spaces where masking is still required by LACDPH, including healthcare settings, public transit, etc.  Please note it is still strongly recommended that individuals wear a well-fitting mask, regardless of vaccination status, when indoors and/or in crowded settings.

Those who are not up to date on COVID-19 vaccinations will continue to be required to wear a well-fitting mask indoors until further notice.

Outdoor masking is optional for all.

Please note it is still strongly recommended that individuals wear a well-fitting mask, regardless of vaccination status, when indoors and/or in crowded settings.

Students, faculty and staff who must remove their masks during music and performing arts, playing wind instruments, singing, etc. indoors will still be required to continue testing three times per week, regardless of vaccination status, until LACDPH lifts this requirement for institutes of higher education (PDF).

As mentioned in the Jan. 21 BruinPost, UCLA will provide upgraded masks — at no cost — to students, faculty and staff. Upgraded masks include medical grade surgical masks, KN95 masks, and N95 respirators for voluntary use.

Beginning Monday, Jan. 31, temporary upgraded mask distribution centers will be set up at the following locations for students, faculty and staff:

Ongoing upgraded mask distribution for students

Students may also obtain upgraded masks free of charge at various campus locations including (but not limited to) the John Wooden Center; Student Activities Center; Tom Bradley International Hall; and ASUCLA locations including UCLA Store locations, the Ackerman Union Information Window and Ackerman indoor dining locations. Students may pick up individual masks for daily use, or request up to five at a time for the week.

Upgraded mask distribution for students in UCLA housing facilities

To reduce congestion and wait times at the sites listed above, students living in UCLA housing facilities are asked to pick up their upgraded masks (medical grade surgical masks provided) at the front desk of their residence at any time.

Department upgraded masks distribution for faculty and staff

Upgraded masks may also be available to faculty and staff through their respective departments. Departments can request upgraded masks for their employees via the Emergency PPE Supply Store at no cost. Departments are asked to place orders only for those supplies needed to meet the needs of their employees who may request them. Those with questions may contact Bryan Ruiz at bruiz@ehs.ucla.edu.

Students, faculty and staff will need to show their Bruin ID card at the time of pick up at any of these sites.

Q: Can in-person organized events be held on campus? What are the protocols for food and drink at in-person events?

A: Updated guidance for campus events on the UCLA campus was posted April 6, 2022.

Food and drink:

In order to reduce population density in indoor dining venues and potential exposure while eating, we highly encourage students, faculty and staff to utilize to-go or outdoor dining options.

Masking:

Masking is highly recommended at indoor events for individuals who are up to date on their COVID-19 vaccines with the appropriate vaccine verification process. Masking is required for individuals who are not up to date on their COVID-19 vaccines when attending an indoor UCLA Organized Event or indoor mega event until further notice. 

Masking  is  recommended (but no longer required at  outdoor  UCLA  Organized  Events and outdoor mega events, regardless of vaccination status. 

Vaccination verification or proof of negative test:

Vaccine verification or proof of negative test is recommended (but no longer required) for indoor and outdoor UCLA Organized events.

Event organizers or venue managers, if they choose, may request attendees to present their symptom survey clearance certificate upon entry to events, provided this is implemented equitably and attendees are provided prior notice. This includes non-affiliates attending UCLA events.
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Q: I just tested positive for COVID. What do I do?

A: If you tested positive outside of the UCLA surveillance testing system, isolate immediately and call the COVID hotline at 310-206-6217 for students or 310-267-3300 for faculty and staff to leave a voicemail for the Exposure Management Team. If you tested via UCLA surveillance testing OR at the Ashe Center, you do not need to call the hotline; a member of the exposure management team will contact you for case investigation. Case Investigation outreach is delayed at this time. While waiting for a call from Exposure Management Team, please notify any close contacts of your positive test.

Q: I was exposed to someone who tested positive for COVID-19, but have no symptoms. What should I do?

A: Contact the Exposure Management Team. If you are fully vaccinated, you do not need to quarantine. Please test through UCLA campus surveillance testing 5-7 days after your exposure. If you are NOT fully vaccinated, you need to quarantine immediately. The Exposure Management Team will provide specific guidance for testing and length of quarantine.

Q: What are the COVID isolation requirements for students?

A:  Any student who tests positive for COVID-19 outside of the UCLA surveillance testing system should contact the Exposure Management Team/Ashe COVID Hotline at (310) 206-6217.

Those who have tested positive for COVID-19 may end isolation after five days if certain conditions are met, including obtaining a negative COVID-19 antigen test result on day 5 or later, are fever free for at least 24 hours and symptoms are improving (if symptomatic). They must wear a mask around others, indoor and outdoors, for 10 days.

If you have symptoms, Day 0 is your first day of symptoms. Day 1 is the first full day after your symptoms developed.

If you do not have symptoms, Day 0 is the day your positive test was taken. Day 1 is the first full day after your positive test.

Quarantine: Close contacts who are not exempt from quarantine (see below) can end quarantine if they receive a negative test (through the campus vending machine PCR test kits) on day 5 or later AND are asymptomatic.

Those who are unable to test must isolate or quarantine for the full 10 days, as specified. They must wear a mask around others, indoors and outdoors, for 10 days.

Day 0 is your last day of contact (exposure) with the infected person. Day 1 is the first full day after your last exposure.

Quarantine Exemption
Individuals are exempt from quarantine if they are in close contact with someone who tested positive but themselves are up to date on their COVID-19 vaccines (i.e., have received their COVID-19 booster or are fully vaccinated but not yet booster-eligible per LACDPH definition (PDF), or individuals who have recovered from COVID-19 within the previous 90 days. This exemption includes following testing and masking requirements.

The revised isolation and quarantine protocol can be reviewed here with changes highlighted in the document: Isolation and Quarantine Protocol (PDF).

Q: What are the isolation requirements for faculty and staff?

A:  Those who have tested positive for COVID-19 may end isolation after five days if certain conditions are met, including obtaining a negative COVID-19 antigen test result on day 5 or later, are fever free for at least 24 hours and symptoms are improving (if symptomatic). They must wear a mask around others, indoor and outdoors, for 10 days.

If you have symptoms, Day 0 is your first day of symptoms. Day 1 is the first full day after your symptoms developed.

If you do not have symptoms, Day 0 is the day your positive test was taken. Day 1 is the first full day after your positive test.

Quarantine: Close contacts who are not exempt from quarantine (see below) can end quarantine if they receive a negative test (through the campus vending machine PCR test kits) on day 5 or later AND are asymptomatic.

Those who are unable to test must isolate or quarantine for the full 10 days, as specified. They must wear a mask around others, indoors and outdoors, for 10 days.

Day 0 is your last day of contact (exposure) with the infected person. Day 1 is the first full day after your last exposure.

Quarantine Exemption
Individuals are exempt from quarantine if they are in close contact with someone who tested positive but themselves are up to date on their COVID-19 vaccines (i.e., have received their COVID-19 booster or are fully vaccinated but not yet booster-eligible per LACDPH definition (PDF)), or individuals who have recovered from COVID-19 within the previous 90 days. This exemption includes following testing and masking requirements.

The revised isolation and quarantine protocol can be reviewed here with changes highlighted in the document: Isolation and Quarantine Protocol (PDF)

Q: I am fully vaccinated but I believe I have been in close contact with an infected person. What should I do?

A: At this time, fully vaccinated students, faculty and staff — those who are at least two weeks past the final dose of a two-dose mRNA vaccine or two weeks past the single-dose Johnson & Johnson vaccine — who have been in close contact with an infected person but are asymptomatic do not need to quarantine. It is recommended that they test for COVID-19 five to seven days after their initial exposure and that they closely monitor their symptoms for 14 days after their exposure.

Q: What should I do if I know I’ve been exposed to COVID-19?

A:  TUCLA students, faculty, and staff who have been identified as a close contact of someone who has tested positive for COVID-19 are subject to quarantine unless they meet the following quarantine exemption criteria:

  • Persons who are asymptomatic.
  • Persons who have recovered from COVID-19 infection within the previous 90 days.

Definition of close contact: Given UCLA’s high vaccination rates and properly ventilated indoor spaces, UCLA has received approval from LACDPH to use the 6-foot/15-min/24-hr definition for all indoor campus spaces when determining close contacts (i.e., being within six feet of a COVID-19 case for a cumulative total of 15 minutes or greater in any 24-hour period. Additionally, persons with an outdoor exposure at school are not considered close contacts. See LACDPH IHE Exposure Management Plan and Cal/OSHA ETS for details.

If well-fitting masks were worn during the close contact and the exemption criteria were met, proceed to take a COVID test within 3-5 days following initial exposure to someone tested positive. While waiting for the result, no quarantine is necessary but continued mask-wearing is highly recommended.

Refer to the UCLA COVID-19 Isolation and Quarantine Protocol (updated May 9, 2022) for details on isolation and quarantine protocols.

Q: Does the university require that all students and community members get vaccinated for COVID-19? Are vaccine boosters required?

A: All UCLA students and personnel, including non-degree educational program participants on campus, are required to be fully vaccinated. Narrow exemptions and exceptions will be allowed based on medical, religious and disability grounds, along with deferrals due to pregnancy.

Consistent with the UC systemwide vaccine policy (PDF), UCLA is requiring vaccine boosters for all who are eligible. Getting vaccinated remains an effective strategy for reducing the severity of COVID-19. Students must have uploaded proof to the Ashe Student Portal by Jan. 18.  Faculty and staff must have provided proof through the UCLA Symptom Survey/Vaccine Verification System by Jan. 31. This booster requirement applies to those who plan to work on site at least part- or full-time during the winter term. The booster requirement does not apply to those who are working fully remotely or those who have an approved exception.

Q: I recently tested positive for COVID, but have already cleared my isolation period. Do I have to participate in UCLA’s return to campus testing or weekly surveillance testing?

A: If you tested positive for COVID-19 in the last 90 days, you do not need to test weekly until it’s been 90 days since your positive result. Please maintain proof of your positive test (official lab report or note from your clinician confirming when you tested positive). You may be asked to submit proof to waive out of the weekly testing requirement.

Q: I tested positive on a rapid antigen test done at UCLA, but am waiting for the result of my confirmatory PCR test. What do I do?

A: Please continue to isolate pending the result of your PCR test. If your PCR test if negative, you are free to leave isolation as long as you do not have symptoms. If your result is positive, please continue to isolate and a member of the exposure management team will contact you for case investigation.

Q: I recently did a rapid test at home and it was positive. What should I do?

A: You need to isolate immediately. Call the COVID hotline at 310-206-6217 if you are a student and leave a voicemail for the Exposure Management Team who will return your call during business hours. For faculty and staff, please contact the UCLA COVID Call Center at (310) 267-3300.

Q: What happens if I have to miss a class or an exam?

A: UCLA faculty members are committed to accommodating students who cannot be in class due to isolation and quarantine protocols or because they haven’t been cleared by the Symptom Monitoring Survey through video or audio streaming or recordings, makeup assignments and assessments, alternative projects or other means. Instructors have been informed that students’ absences due to isolation or quarantining or a failure to clear the daily symptom check should not factor into any attendance component of students’ final grade.

Students needing to isolate or quarantine are encouraged to notify their course instructors as soon as possible and explain their circumstances. If an instructor requires a medical note, students can visit the Arthur Ashe Student Health & Wellness Center’s patient portal and select the medical excuse option under “Messages.”

Students who are significantly sick with COVID-19 may qualify as being temporarily disabled and receive support from the Center for Accessible Education following an interactive process with the instructor.

Q: What is UCLA doing to address concerns from students with disabilities who need remote access to classes?

A: Since our return to the classroom in the fall, we have seen instructors adapt to the needs of students unable to attend class in person by recording and/or broadcasting courses live via Zoom, designing assessments that are not tied to specific times and locations, and more. In keeping with guidance previously offered by the administration and the Academic Senate, we endorse instructor use and sharing of recordings and livestreams for students who are absent for pandemic-related reasons, and reaffirm our support for providing other flexibility when it serves learning and equity goals.

We note that faculty have the responsibility, under UC systemwide policy, for applying academic standards to ensure that our university’s degrees have value — with each individual instructor possessing the authority to make decisions about their courses and the dissemination of teaching materials. We know many instructors are already doing so much to be flexible while maintaining academic excellence, and we offer our gratitude. For those who wish to learn more, resources related to using technology effectively for teaching, learning and assessment can be found on our Center for the Advancement of Teaching website. Several other specific resources appear below:

Students who are immunocompromised, have disabilities or special medical circumstances that make them more vulnerable to contracting COVID-19 may seek reasonable academic adjustments by:

  • Contacting the UCLA Center for Accessible Education (CAE), which will review requests from students to reorder course sequences for their health and safety, seeking to ensure that immunocompromised and other students do not lose opportunities to take required courses in a timely way.
  • Requesting notes from CAE, which is assigning notetakers to attend in-person classes and provide notes and/or individual recordings of the lectures for those students who have been granted accommodations.
Q: How is UCLA handling the rollout of the COVID-19 vaccine?

A: The UCLA COVID-19 Response and Recovery Task Force has been hosting a series of virtual town halls to update faculty, staff and students on the progress of UCLA Health’s vaccination distribution process. To stay updated on vaccine-related developments including booster shots, please visit the UCLA COVID-19 Vaccine Information Hub.

Q: Did the university require that all students and community members get the flu vaccine?

A: Yes. UCLA required all students, faculty, other academic appointees and staff learning, living or working at UC locations to get their flu vaccines by Nov. 19, 2021. Students who are noncompliant are subject to an academic hold. Information about where to find vaccination sites, how to schedule a vaccine and insurance coverage can be found here. UCLA had previously required flu vaccines by Nov. 1, but the deadline was extended to Nov. 19.

Those who file for an exception will be required to wear face masks on campus through the end of flu season even if COVID-19 protocols are lifted.
To document your vaccine or to file for an exception, please do the following:

  1. Navigate to the UCLA COVID-19 Symptom Monitoring and Vaccination Verification System.
  2. Click the green “Flu Vaccine Verification” button at the top of the page.
  3. Select your UCLA affiliation.
  4. Enter your Single Sign-On login credentials and follow the prompts.
Q: What does proof of vaccination for COVID-19 mean at UCLA?

A: Proof of “full vaccination” requires a government-issued photo identification AND one of the following: a vaccination card (which includes name of person vaccinated, type of vaccine received and date last dose administered) OR a photo of the attendee’s vaccination card as a separate document OR a photo of the attendee’s vaccination card. The event location manager or ticket taker at the entrance should request proof of full vaccination be shown prior to entry. However, such records will not be collected or stored and no further inquiries are permitted about vaccination status or lack thereof.

People who do not have clearance may be asked to leave or denied entry to an event. Students who are not in compliance with policy may be referred to the Dean of Students Office for the Student Conduct Process.

Beginning Nov. 4, for all people age 18 and over, UCLA began requiring proof of vaccination and a valid ID or a negative test result and an approved medical or religious exemption in order to enter the locations listed here. UCLA students and staff can present the clearance they receive from their daily COVID-19 Symptom Monitoring Survey via the UCLA Mobile app. The email version of the symptom survey clearance confirmation will not be accepted.

Q: Is daily symptom reporting required?

A: Yes. Daily symptom checks are currently required for students, faculty, staff (including UCLA Health employees) and others (including visitors, guest lecturers and laboratory volunteers) who are living, learning or working on campus or at other UCLA properties, regardless of their vaccination status.  Daily symptom monitoring protocols will remain in effect for the entirety of spring quarter 2022.

Take the symptom monitoring survey

The survey, which can be completed on a smartphone, tablet or computer, should take no more than five minutes. Individuals will need to receive a daily clearance certificate from the survey.

The UCLA Mobile app, which is available on the App Store and the Google Play Store, now includes access to the Symptom Monitoring System.

Q: Can a unit require people to wear masks while outdoors at our events?

A: Updated guidance for campus events on the UCLA campus was posted April 6, 2022.  Masking is no longer required at outdoor mega events.  Unvaccinated members of the Bruin community must comply with additional non-pharmaceutical interventions, such as wearing masks at all times when around others.

UCLA recommends that individuals, even those who are vaccinated, wear a mask when outside in large groups in which physical distancing of at least three feet is not feasible.

Q: Where can I find information on daily reported COVID-19 cases on campus and where they occurred?

A: Information on daily reported COVID-19 cases among members of the campus community can be found on the UCLA COVID-19 resources page. As of Sept. 23, 2021, this page also reports the percentage of UCLA students, faculty and staff who are fully vaccinated.

Q: What would cause the university to switch back to remote learning?

A: Eight separate pivot points — including increased UCLA or regional rates of breakthrough cases, increases in UCLA or regional positive tests, increases in COVID-related deaths in the region, decreases in available ICU beds, decrease in available isolation capacity or contract-tracing capacity — will result in implementation of additional health and safety protocols or a scaling down of in-person activities.

Pivots ranging from an increase in remote learning to limitations of campus activities will be triggered based on an increase in those eight factors and the severity of increase in those factors.

This is addressed in the document titled UCLA COVID-19 Pivot Plan and Decision Matrix. This document can also be found on the COVID site protocols page.

UCLA Samueli COVID Efforts:

Q: How is the School of Engineering contributing to COVID-19 relief efforts?

A: Engineers are problem solvers. At UCLA, we have not shied away from challenges presented by COVID-19. Our computer scientists and engineers have been collaborating with colleagues at the David Geffen School of Medicine and UCLA Health to develop urgently needed personal protective equipment, cutting-edge testing methods, predictive models adopted by the CDC and vaccine boosters. And there are numerous creative student-led efforts as well.

You can read the highlights of UCLA Samueli COVID-related research projects and press coverage here.

New Students:

Q: Are new student programs still available? Can I defer my enrollment?

A: Please visit the New Student Programs website for details. On a case-by-case basis, students may submit a written request for a deferment to another term if they have significant extenuating circumstances. For students deferring to later quarters, there could be issues with certain classes due to missing specific prerequisites taught in earlier quarters.

Enrollment and Classes:

Q: Will I be able to audit a class?

A: Auditing classes will be up to each individual professor’s discretion. If you’d like to audit a specific class, you can email the professors and they may be able to add you as a participant to the CCLE page and allow you to access course material.

Q: Will lectures be recorded for students who cannot attend in-person classes?

A: If students cannot attend in-person classes, professors should consider the best means to provide instruction to these students. This can include allowing the student to arrange for the classes to be recorded through Zoom. Many classrooms are equipped for BruinCast Video or Audio or Zoom streaming and professors are encouraged to record their lectures.

Q: Are there limits on the number of students that can be in a classroom when in-person instruction is taking place?

A: UCLA is not subject to any classroom density limitations. There are no caps on the number of students in a classroom beyond the normal room capacity. See UCLA’s Protocols for Fall 2021 Instruction from the COVID-19 Response and Recovery Task Force and the Academic Personal Office.

Q: What should I do if a classmate refuses to wear a mask or is not wearing it appropriately?

A: In some cases, students may not be wearing a face mask simply because they forgot to put one on. Complimentary disposable face masks are available at the John Wooden Center for students who do not have a face mask. If a classmate is not wearing their face mask properly, you may ask them to adjust it to cover their nose and mouth if you are comfortable doing so. You may also ask your professor or instructor to remind students of the face mask requirement and ask them to put on their face mask or adjust it.

Faculty members are encouraged to consider the following:

If an individual student who is out of compliance with campus COVID-19 mitigation measures refuses to comply and refuses to leave upon request, remember that they are not likely to be a significant threat to others who are wearing face masks and complying with campus policies.

If a student refuses to leave upon request, instructors may consider ending the class or shifting it to remote instruction for the day, though they are cautioned to carefully consider whether the risk posed by a single non compliant student justifies the learning disruption for the rest of the students. All such incidents should be reported to the Office of Student Conduct at dean@saonet.ucla.edu or 310-825-3871. See the CRRTF’s FAQ on classroom management for details. UCPD should not be contacted in such cases as UCPD is not charged with enforcement of the face mask requirement or other COVID-19 mitigation requirements.

Reports of violations will result in a determination, expected to be made within one business day, of whether the violation was willful or not. People with willful violations, multiple violations and violations believed to have resulted in infection will face measures up to and including exclusion from campus.

Student Life:

Q: What are the current guidelines on small gatherings in Los Angeles County?

A: Please see the LACDPH website for the current (revised April 1, 2022). UCLA has its own regarding wearing masks indoors.

Q: Are recreation centers and libraries open on campus? What about the museums?

A: Outdoor facilities have reopened with modified hours of operation.

Now Open:

  • Drake Stadium
  • Hitch basketball courts
  • Marina Aquatic Center
  • Sunset Canyon Recreation Center
  • Tennis courts – LATC, Sunset, Sycamore
  • Intramural Field
  • Bruin Fitness Center
  • John Wooden Center
  • Kinross Recreation Center
  • Student Activities Center basketball courts

Updates will be added to the UCLA Recreation website.

UCLA Library is open for spring quarter 2022. Libraries are open to BruinCard holders and the public.  Face masks are required for those who are not up to date on their COVID-19 vaccinations.

The Hammer Museum and Fowler Museum are now open to the public. Face masks are required for those who are not up to date on their COVID-19 vaccinations.

Masking is still highly recommended even after the mandate is lifted on April 11.

Financial Assistance:

Q: I’m uncertain about financial aid. Can changes in enrolled units or other areas affect my financial aid? Is there anything else I need to know?

A: Students receiving financial aid can find answers related to such changes on the Financial Aid and Scholarships website. The university is not changing policies and procedures regarding declaring nonattendance or withdrawal.

Q: Are there any scholarships or fellowships available to students through the School of Engineering?

A: UCLA Samueli offers a variety of undergraduate scholarships and graduate fellowships that help remove some of the financial barriers for promising students. These may be awarded on the basis of financial need, academic merit or other criteria, and all current or incoming undergraduate/graduate students are welcome to apply. Matriculated graduated students are eligible to apply for the National Science Foundation’s Graduate Research Fellowship.

If you are an undergraduate or incoming freshman/transfer student, click here to view information and application instructions for a UCLA Samueli scholarship.

If you are a graduate student or candidate, you may search for fellowships available to UCLA graduate students.

Q: Are there any resources for students who have been financially impacted by COVID-19 and other unforeseen crises?

A: UCLA remains committed to supporting students during these unprecedented times. We recognize that students may be experiencing a variety of challenges and financial hardship.

If you are experiencing a financial crisis beyond available financial aid resources, please contact the Economic Crisis Response Team (ECRT) by completing the ECRT Self-Assessment Intake Form.

For information on submitting appeals or other general Financial Aid related questions, please visit the Financial Aid & Scholarships website.

Faculty and Staff:

Q: What happens if my students have to miss a class or an exam?
A: With the return to in-person instruction, there is likely to be an uptick in students missing class due to isolation and quarantine protocols or because they haven’t been cleared by the Symptom Monitoring Survey. The prospect of missing class time, projects or assessments can be daunting, and we’d never want our students to answer the Symptom Monitoring Survey untruthfully for fear of missing a class or an exam. If our students do not feel well and are exhibiting COVID-19-related symptoms, they should stay home and rest. As faculty members, we should be committed to accommodating students who cannot be in class for these reasons through video or audio streaming or recordings, makeup assignments and assessments, alternative projects or other means.
Q: How can I best support students who request special accommodations?

A: To best support our entire community, instructors are being strongly encouraged to record live lectures, as per the Academic Senate guidelines and adopt the following approaches:

  • Create video or audio recordings of lectures to be watched either live via Zoom or at a later time.
  • Determine whether the room in which you are lecturing is equipped for BruinCast Video, Zoom Streaming, or BruinCast Audio setup here.
    • If your classroom is equipped for BruinCast Video or Audio, register for your classes to be recorded here and lectures will be recorded/posted for you.
    • If your classroom is equipped for Zoom Streaming, see Zoom Streaming instructions here.
    • If your classroom does not have any of these options, use this DIY Guide for recording and posting your in-person lectures yourself.
    • For additional questions or information, see the Technology and Access Guide.
  • When broadcasting lectures synchronously via Zoom:
    • Use real-time automatic captions to support many different types of learners and increase access. (Reach out to the Center for Advancement of Teaching about alternative options.)
    • Remember to check in on the remote students and provide opportunities for them to participate by calling on them, having them participate in classroom polls, having them react to questions you pose or other methods that are outlined in the guide for Teaching Local and Remote Students.
  • Allow accommodations for student absences caused by reasons related to public health mitigation (such as a student’s compliance with a symptom monitoring instruction to remain off campus, go into isolation or quarantine) when determining a final grade.
  • Reschedule exams and presentations to accommodate individual student absences caused by the public health risk mitigation requirement to go into isolation or quarantine.
  • For more information, view the COVID-19 Response and Recovery Task Force Faculty FAQs for Winter 2022 and the Teaching Resources and Recommendations.

Q: Am I required to check the COVID-19 Clearance Portal to verify if my students have cleared the daily Symptom Monitoring Survey?

A: Yes, all professors and teaching assistants are required to verify if their students have cleared the daily Symptom Monitoring Survey on the COVID-19 Clearance Portal. If you do not know how to access the portal or if you cannot find the class roster on the portal, please consult the Clearance Portal Tip Sheet. If a student is not cleared, they should not be in class. If a student did not fill out the survey, please encourage them to do so before the start of class.

Q: What should department staff expect in their return to campus?

A: UCLA has created a Campus Ramp-Up Planning Guide that provides guidance for FlexWork opportunities, strategies to reduce employee density and other resources to make the transition back to in-person offices as safe and smooth as possible.

Managers are encouraged to adopt FlexWork practices, more information for which is available in the FlexWork Guide for Managers. FlexWork allows employees to work remotely on a full-time or part-time basis depending on their individual needs and comfort levels, usually utilizing a hybrid approach to remote and in-person work.

Q: What are UCLA guidelines for instructors on COVID-related questions in class?

A: For faculty needing information on student masking requirements, accommodations, microphone reservation and other COVID-related questions, please read this FAQ.

Q: Are faculty required to wear masks while lecturing?

A: As of April 11, 2022, indoor masking is no longer required for students, faculty and staff who are up to date on their COVID-19 vaccinations — this includes while faculty are lecturing.

Please note that indoor masking is still highly recommended even after the mandate is lifted on April 11.

Q: When faculty are required to quarantine, what should they do about their classes?
A: Given the university’s commitment to in-person instruction, instructors are not permitted to unilaterally move their classes to a remote format without prior permission from the administration and/or at the direction UCLA’s Exposure Management Team. An instructor may move a single, individual in-person class, or up to two classes in a row, to Zoom without prior authorization under the following circumstances:

  • The instructor has an illness or physical symptoms and is thereby not cleared for onsite work from the symptom monitor survey but feels well enough to teach remotely.
  • The instructor has had direct, recent, extensive close contact with someone who is COVID-positive and believes that they should temporarily quarantine (even though current university protocols and public health orders do not require vaccinated individuals to do so if they remain asymptomatic).

The university needs to understand the frequency with which such situations arise across the institution. For this reason, instructors must inform their department chair or chair’s designee within 48 hours of any in-person class moved to Zoom for the above reasons.

Best practices also include preparing a fellow faculty member, co-teacher or TA to lead one or more classes in case the primary instructor is not available.

See the protocols for instructors.

Housing and Campus Services:

Q: Are students who are not living on campus able to purchase meal plans?

A: Due to COVID-19 mitigations and staffing shortages, UCLA is not offering the Bruin Meal Plan, the plan traditionally offered to students living off campus, for winter quarter 2022. As staff levels increase, we are re-evaluating dining operations and will open additional dining options.

Q: What are the dining options for students living on the Hill?

A: Dining halls are currently open. However, in order to reduce population density in indoor dining venues and potential exposure while eating, all dining halls on the Hill offer to-go meals and students are encouraged to take advantage of this option.

Technology and Accessibility:

Q: How will UCLA assist students who feel they don’t have adequate technology resources? What if I have problems with my laptop/device not being compatible for class?

A: Students can submit a form to borrow a laptop and other technology from the UCLA Library for an entire quarter, while supplies last. If you have compatibility issues with your current technology, submit a message using the MyUCLA Student Support COVID-19 Message Center. For one-time internet connectivity error, please get in touch with your professor to attempt to resolve the problem. For more major technology accessibility issues, UCLA has several programs that can help with purchasing or borrowing laptops,  and other devices. Please visit Bruin Resources and Tools for more information. We also encourage any student who may be facing financial hardship to reach out to our Economic Crisis Response Team for assistance.

Q: What accommodations can be made for students with technological difficulties, particularly regarding attendance requirements and live-time activities?

A: Students with difficulties that prevent them from participating in synchronous class activities should communicate directly with their professors or TAs to discuss possible accommodations. Further concerns can be directed to the UCLA Academic Senate. Read the full list of adjusted policies from the Academic Senate here.

Q: What is the university doing to address concerns from students with disabilities?

A: Students who are immunocompromised, have disabilities or special medical circumstances that make them more vulnerable to contracting COVID-19 may seek reasonable academic adjustments including:

  • Contacting the UCLA Center for Accessible Education (CAE), which will review requests from students to reorder course sequences for their health and safety, seeking to ensure that immunocompromised and other students do not lose opportunities to take required courses in a timely way.
  • Requesting notes from CAE, which is assigning notetakers to attend in-person classes and provide notes and/or individual recordings of the lectures for those students who have been granted accommodations.

To best support our entire community, instructors are being encouraged to adopt the following approaches:

  • Create video or audio recordings of lectures, either live via Zoom or to watch later.
  • When broadcasting lectures via Zoom, use real-time automatic captions to support many different types of learners and increase access. (Reach out to the Center for Advancement of Teaching about alternative options.)
  • Allow accommodations for student absences caused by reasons related to public health mitigation (such as a student’s compliance with a symptom monitoring instruction to remain off campus, go into isolation or quarantine) when determining a final grade.
  • Reschedule exams and presentations to accommodate individual student absences caused by public health risk mitigation requirement to go into isolation or quarantine.

Since our return to the classroom in the fall, we have seen instructors adapt to the needs of students unable to attend class in person by recording and/or broadcasting courses live via Zoom, designing assessments that are not tied to specific times and locations, and more. In keeping with guidance previously offered by the administration and the Academic Senate, we endorse instructor use and sharing of recordings and livestreams for students who are absent for pandemic-related reasons, and reaffirm our support for providing other flexibility when it serves learning and equity goals.

For those who wish to learn more, resources related to using technology effectively for teaching, learning and assessment can be found on our Center for the Advancement of Teaching website. Several other specific resources appear below:

For more information, view the Covid-19 Response and Recovery Task Force Faculty FAQs for winter 2022 and Teaching Resources and Recommendations.

Research, Teaching Assistant (TA) Positions and Internships:

Q: I’m going to be a researcher or TA. Is there anything I need to know?

A: For positions that do not involve compensation, there should be no issues. For TA-ship, which involves verification of status and Social Security number, the U.S. has certain guidelines; individuals must be hired by a third party in their home country. There will be more information to come, so please contact your specific department. TOP (test of oral proficiency) exams will be offered via Zoom. When TOPs are offered in person, they will take place at 270 Powell Library in the Instructional Media Lab.

Q: How can I become a graduate student researcher?

A: Graduate Student Researchers (GSRs) assist faculty with scholarly research and may or may not collaborate in the publication of research results. Students interested in a GSR position should contact their faculty advisor to discuss potential opportunities.

Q: How do I find an internship?

A: The Undergraduate Internship Program (UIP) is a new initiative from the UCLA Samueli School of Engineering to assist students by providing resources, information and opportunities. UIP hosts multiple workshops throughout the year to better prepare students in securing an internship, offers a seminar on the internship process, co-hosts the ESUC Industry Liaison Committee along with ESUC, and offers organizations the resource to track attendance of their events.

The UCLA Career Center also offers a variety of resources such as career counseling, career fairs, job-seeking platforms and more.

Health and Wellness:

Q: How do I know if someone tested positive for COVID-19 was recently in a campus building I plan to visit?

A: UCLA created a COVID-19 case dashboard (DOCX) in an effort to keep our community members informed if they were present in a building where someone who tested positive for COVID-19 had been. Whenever UCLA receives notice of a COVID-19 positive case occurring on a UCLA property, the case location dashboard will be updated and an email notification will be sent to those who indicated in the symptom monitoring survey if they were present in the related facilities. These email notifications will be sent to both campus and UCLA Health employees.

Q: What precautions is UCLA taking to keep our community safe?

A: The safety of our students, faculty and staff remains our top priority. UCLA has put recommended infection-control procedures in place on campus. These include physical distancing, lower density in classrooms and other spaces, and frequent cleaning of classrooms and facilities. Additionally, daily symptom checks will be required for anyone coming to campus or living in on-campus housing.  Information on campus protocols is available online and updated frequently.

Please follow UCLA’s Standard Operating Procedure (revised Jan. 26, 2022) when reporting a confirmed COVID-19 case.

Q: What wellness and mental health resources are available to me, even remotely?

A: Students have access to multiple mental health resources from Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS), which has an engineering virtual satellite clinic, to the Resilience in Your Student Experience (RISE) Center. CAPS has also provided a guide that can help inform students on available resources and how to access them.

The UCLA Samueli School of Engineering continues to partner with CAPS to offer free, confidential, brief support for students within the School of Engineering.

Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) Support Services

Support for students within the School of Engineering will be offered via Zoom or in person. To schedule, call the CAPS front desk at (310) 825-0768 and mention the Engineering Satellite

Weeks 5-10 Engineering CAPS Satellite
Wednesdays 10-12 pm

Zoom Meeting ID: 975 0774 4878 Passcode: 327050
Virtual Only

Fridays 1-3pm
Zoom Meeting ID: 975 0774 4878 Passcode: 327050
OR In-Person at Boelter Hall, 6288-G

Additional Wellness Support:

CAPS Training and Support Groups – Relaxation, Time Management, Problem-solving, Academic Success, Anxiety, and more.

The RISE Center
A wellness hub for all students, faculty, and staff who want to find encouragement through mindfulness and resiliency. This hub is called Resilience in the Student Experience (RISE) and is located on campus, downstairs at Lu Valle Commons room B-01. RISE serves as a physical extension of CAPS, and as part of its programming, RISE offers meditations, yoga, peer coaching, and other mind-body modalities.

Dashew Services for International Students

The GRIT Coaching ProgramSign up for a GRIT Peer Coach! If you’re looking to focus on your holistic well-being and personal development this year, join GRIT! GRIT stands for guidance, resilience, integrity, and transformation. Undergraduate students can enroll at any time during the academic year to receive one-on-one support from trained peer coaches. Topics of focus during individualized coaching sessions include stress/time management, effective communication skills, meditation/mindfulness, cultural humility, goal setting, comprehensive campus resource referrals, and much more! Our goal is to empower students to discover their true thriving potential and ultimately give back to the greater UCLA campus community. Explore our site for more info!

WAZO CONNECT Peer Mentorship Program

Wazo Connect is a peer mentorship program for students who are feeling lonely, stressed, or overwhelmed and who prefer a more informal support system. Mentors are trained by CAPS, CARE, GRIT, LGBTQ+ Center and Psychology professors. Mentors meet with mentees weekly/bi-weekly and can accompany them to important appointments and meetings if requested. Interested students can sign up to get a peer mentor from the website: https://www.wazoconnect.com/jointhefam For more information please visit our website www.wazoconnect.com or our Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/wazoconnect/.

CAPS can also assist incoming students with utilizing resources such as the TAO app, which is available and covered for any student with a UCLA email address. However, CAPS cannot treat incoming students until they are fully registered or enrolled.

Students with disabilities are also eligible to receive accommodations from the Center for Accessible Education. If you are experiencing a crisis, please visit UCLA’s CAPS website for additional resources. For life-threatening emergencies, please call 911 or UCPD’s 24-hour dispatch line at 310-825-1491.

Counseling is also available for staff and faculty.

Q: How can I report violations of public health guidelines in the UCLA campus community?

A: Email the Office of Student Conduct regarding known individuals at dean@saonet.ucla.edu. You can also report incidents anonymously online via the Whistleblower Hotline or by phone at 800-403-4744 providing the date, time, nature and location of the violation. In urgent situations, call the On-Campus Housing Dispatch at 310-206-9633.

Diversity and Inclusion:

Q: What steps has UCLA Samueli taken to address diversity and inclusion in the School of Engineering?

A: At UCLA, diversity is an indispensable element of academic excellence. The UCLA Samueli School of Engineering is committed to providing a more equitable, diverse, inclusive and nurturing learning environment. We strive to foster a diverse student and faculty body, with programs designed to complement a rigorous engineering education for anyone with the talent and desire to succeed. A population rich in diversity expands the range of knowledge, experiences and viewpoints, leading to innovative new solutions that otherwise would not be possible. Programs to enable the success of all of our students, regardless of ethnic or economic background, are in place — and are making progress. Over the next decade, we hope to double the percentage of underrepresented minorities and increase the percentage of women in both our student body and our faculty. Please visit our EDI page for more information.

Clubs & Organizations:
American Indian Science & Engineering Society (AISES)
Arab American Association of Engineers and Architects (AAAEA)
Association for Computing Machinery-Women (ACM-W)
IEEE Women Advancing Technology through Teamwork (WATT)
Korean-American Scientists and Engineers Association at UCLA (BruinKSEA)
National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE)
Pilipinos in Engineering and Science (PIES)
Queer and Trans in STEM (QTSTEM)
Society of Asian Scientists and Engineers (SASE)
Society of Latino Engineers and Scientists (SOLES)
Society of Women Engineers (SWE)
GradSWE at UCLA

Full List of UCLA Samueli Student Clubs & Organizations

Programs:
Women in Engineering (WE@UCLA)
Center for Excellence in Engineering and Diversity (CEED)

Discrimination:

Q: I feel that I’m being targeted based on my race and ethnic background due to the outbreak of COVID-19, what should I do?

A: UCLA Samueli is deeply committed to providing an equitable, diverse and inclusive learning environment. We ask that anyone who experiences a bias incident to report it to us by completing a UCLA Incident of Bias Reporting Form so we can take action. Resources to report electronic abuse, including UCPD, can be found here.

Q: Why might referring to COVID-19 or the coronavirus by a particular geographic location be offensive?

A: At UCLA, we believe it is important to promote an equitable, inclusive and diverse culture. Using terms such as “Wuhan virus” has unfortunately led to people of Asian and Pacific Islander descent being teased, bullied, harassed, harmed or made to feel like outsiders. See this post from the Office of Equity, Diversity and Inclusion for more information. If you are a target of bullying or harassment, please report it to us by completing a UCLA Incident of Bias Reporting Form so we can take action. Resources to report electronic abuse, including UCPD, can be found here.

The Samueli COVID-19 Task Force

The Samueli COVID-19 task force has been created to address academic and operational issues resulting from the outbreak. Please direct specific questions to the following individuals:
 

Role Name Phone Email
Task Force Chair, and Chair for Academic Affairs Rick Wesel 310-825-2942 wesel@ucla.edu
Chair for Operational Affairs Jeff Goldman 310-825-2704 jgoldman@seas.ucla.edu
Communications Christine Wei-li Lee 310-206-0540 clee@seas.ucla.edu
MSOL and online classes Jenn-Ming Yang 310-825-2758 jyang@seas.ucla.edu
Research Infrastructure Bruce Dunn 310-825-1519 bdunn@ucla.edu

Departments and Programs Contact List

Daphne-Jane Dizon
Emilia Rodriguez-Vera
Bioengineering

Ramiro Hernandez
Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering

Stacey Fong
Civil and Environmental Engineering

Leticia Ortiz
Computational Medicine

Cassandra Franklin
Computer Science

Jaqueline Tran
Electrical and Computer Engineering

Jaine Park
Master of Engineering

Alisa Janesajawan
Master of Science in Engineering Online

Kyle Jung
Materials Science and Engineering

Alex Duffy
Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering