University of California, Los Angeles
February 7—1 0, 2021

ASCE Resiliance

UCLA Samueli School of Engineering

Due to the impacts of COVID19, the Lifelines2021 conference organizers have extended the deadline for abstract submission to May 5, 2020. We do not anticipate additional time extensions for submitting abstracts that are to be followed by full paper submissions for the conference proceedings. The time to submit draft papers has also been extended two weeks.

Submit Your Abstract and Plan to Participate in Lifelines2021

Understanding, Improving, & Operationalizing Hazard Resilience for Lifelines

Time Extension: Abstracts Due May 5, 2020

Please visit our abstract submission site to create account and create submission .

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KEY DATES
Abstract Submission Deadline: May 5, 2020

Notice of Acceptance to Authors: June 2,  2020
Draft Paper Submission Deadline: August 16, 2020
Draft Paper Decision and Comments to Authors: September 28, 2020
Final Paper Submission Deadline: October 28, 2020

Call For Abstracts
View PDF

You are invited to submit an abstract to any of the technical tracks listed. Submitted abstracts must meet the following requirements:

  • Abstracts may be submitted in MS Word for proposed presentations, papers, or sessions and are expected to be between 100 to 400 words. They cannot contain images, tables, or other graphic elements.
  • Presentation Only Abstracts, the submission is to be made by the presenter. Upload an abstract describing the proposed presentation.
  • Paper Abstracts, the submitting author should upload the abstract, draft and final versions of the paper, respond to review comments, and identify the author to present the paper at the conference. Accepted papers will be published in the conference proceedings.
  • Session Abstracts, the submitting author should be the person who will organize the 90-minute session, including selection of session format and identification of speakers. Format may include technical speakers, panel or round table discussion. Speakers in proposed sessions may also submit a paper, which must follow the paper submittal process outlined in this call. The Program Committee may work with the submitting authors as appropriate to merge similar or related sessions.
  • Submissions must include the full names, credentials, affiliations, contact information and email addresses for all authors.
  • During submission, Authors may select between presentation types: podium or poster.
  • Individuals will be limited to a maximum of three podium presentations including all proposed abstracts for presentations, papers, and sessions.
  • Proceedings will be made available after the conference.

Submission Instructions

  1. Visit our abstract submission site to create a submission.
  2. Click on the “Create Account” tab to register an account.
  3. Enter your email address, password and confirm the password. Click the “Sign Up” button. An email will be sent to you.
  4. Click on the turquoise button in your email labeled “Confirm Account.”
  5. A pop-up will appear stating, “Thank you for confirming your email.”
  6. Click “Please click here to login.”
  7. Log in to your account.
  8. Once logged in, a turquoise box will pop up at the top of your screen indicating you have created a submission. You will be in edit mode of that submission.
  9. Complete all the required fields in all the tabs.
  10. Click “Save” on the bottom right of your screen as necessary. If required fields are missing data, you will see the missing data tabs indicated with a red triangle.
  11. Click on the “Submit” button on the bottom right of your screen when you are ready to submit your abstract.

Important Documents

Author Formatting Instructions Sample Document (MS Word)
Draft papers must be formatted using MS Word according to ASCE guidelines.

ASCE Guidelines for Peer reviewers of Proceedings Papers (PDF)
Track Leaders will arrange for a peer review for each draft paper based on the ASCE Guidelines for Peer Reviewers of Proceedings Papers

Authorship, Originality, and Copyright Transfer Agreement (PDF)
Proceedings will be published online and made available to all conference registrants. The proceedings will be published and copyrighted by ASCE.

Tracks and Subtracks Descriptions

The following are descriptions of the conference tracks and subtracks. Topics identified for each are not intended to be comprehensive, and submitters are requested to use their best judgement on where their submissions fit best within the tracks and subtracks. Submissions are recommended to be placed within subtracks. However, if topics do not fit clearly within a subtrack or covers multiple subtracks then submissions should be made at the track level.

LIFELINE INFRASTRUCTURE SYSTEMS

This track covers lifeline systems, critical facilities, and their dependencies and interdependencies related to the conference theme and goals. Topics include but may not be limited to: Lifeline systems and their components; Lifeline system resilience programs; Seismic hazard assessment for lifeline systems; Lifeline system loss estimation; Socio-technical systems as related to lifelines; Performance based earthquake engineering for lifeline systems; Business continuity and continuity of operations; Dams, nuclear power plants, bridges, chemical storage, etc.; Guidelines, standards, and codes for lifeline systems; Planning and mitigation for lifeline system risk reduction and resilience; Lifeline system emergency response, recovery, and rebuild.

Water, wastewater, and flood risk management
This subtrack covers drinking water, wastewater, and flood risk management systems and their components. Topics may include any or all subsystems within their main systems; specific components; organizations which own, operate, and manage them; interactions between the systems; risk and resilience associated with any of these systems or components. In this subtrack flood risk management systems essentially deal with the physical infrastructure and the organizations managing and operating them, flood related hazards should be submitted to the Hazards Track.

Gas and liquid fuels
This subtrack covers gas and liquid fuel systems and their components. Topics may include any or all of the production, supply, refining/processing, transmission, or distribution subsystems within their main systems; specific components; organizations which own, operate, and manage them; interactions between the systems; risk and resilience associated with any of these systems or components.

Electric power
This subtrack covers electric power systems and their components. Topics may include any or all of the generation, transmission, sub-transmission, or distribution subsystems within their main systems; specific components; organizations which own, operate, and manage them; risk and resilience associated with these systems or components.

Communication
This subtrack covers communication systems and their components. Topics may include any or all of the wired or wireless subsystems and modes of transmitting information; specific components; organizations which own, operate, and manage them; advances in 5G; risk and resilience associated with these systems or components.

Transportation
This subtrack covers transportation systems and their components. Topics may include any or all of the transport modes and multi-modal transportation methods; specific components; organizations which own, operate, and manage them; risk and resilience associated with these systems or components; advances in transportation methods.

Solid waste management/ Debris management
This subtrack covers solid waste and debris management systems and their components. Topics may include any or all of the collection, transport, processing, disposal/storage/disbursement subsystems within their main systems; specific components; organizations which own, operate, and manage them; methods for emergency debris clearing; post-event recycling and reuse; managing hazardous materials; risk and resilience associated with any of these systems, components, or methods.

Critical facilities
This subtrack covers critical facilities associated with the general community or working as specific components within the different lifeline systems (e.g., dams, nuclear power plants, healthcare, emergency operations, etc.). Topics may include general aspects on planning, design, construction, operating, or managing critical facilities; building clusters and relation to lifeline systems.

Dependencies and interdependencies
This subtrack covers dependencies and interdependencies associated with lifeline systems, critical facilities, and interactions with the broader communities.

Lifeline system resilience
This subtrack covers all aspects of lifeline infrastructure system resilience and how they support community resilience.

THE 1971 SAN FERNANDO EARTHQUAKE

This track covers a retrospective of the 1971 San Fernando Earthquake, what was learned and how it impacted current states of practice, socio-economic aspects of the earthquake, and international perspectives. Topics may include revisiting cases from the 1971 earthquake; documentation of experiences from those who witnessed the event and recovery; educational aspects to teach the younger generation about significant events in urban areas; lessoned learned by specific lifelines organizations; lifeline system impacts on social and economic systems; how the earthquake influenced advancements in earthquake engineering across the nation and globe.

Retrospective on 1971 San Fernando Earthquake
This subtrack covers retrospectives of the 1971 San Fernando Earthquake. Topics may include revisiting cases of the earthquake and identifying new lessons based on current perspectives; compiling information previously not known or understood; using the event as a opportunity to teach new generations about the effects of earthquakes; eyewitness accounts; impacts on emergency management.

What was learned and how it has impacted current states of practice for: Geo-sciences, Lifeline, Structural, and/or Geotechnical earthquake engineering
This subtrack covers learning from the 1971 San Fernando Earthquake and how it impacted current states of practice. Topics may include advances in geology, seismology or geotechnical earthquake engineering including fault surface rupture, liquefaction, tectonic deformations, landslides, geophysics, ground motion recordings, near-source pulses, aftershock sequences; changes in earthquake policy; effects of geohazards on lifeline systems and building structures and critical facilities. This subtrack offers an opportunity for: each lifeline system directly impacted to provide a review and revisit impacts to their systems; an overview of structural performances; overview of geo-system performances; revisiting the San Fernando Dams and associated emergency response and activities directly effecting the community. The earthquake had a significant effect on engineering design and construction standards allowing papers, presentations, and sessions on how this has influenced current practice. Topics of special interest are how the 1971 San Fernando Earthquake improved performance of lifeline systems in other Southern California earthquakes like the 1992 Landers, 1987 Whitter, 1994 Northridge, and other events, especially these systems impacted by multiple events since 1971.

Socio-economics
This subtrack covers socio-economic effects of the 1971 San Fernando Earthquake. Topics may include social science studies from the earthquake; impacts of the event on social groups; economic impacts of the earthquake; this subtrack offers the opportunity to revisit effects on the community directly resulting from loss of lifeline system services, evacuations resulting from damage to the San Fernando Dams, impacts from the damage to Olive View Hospital, and other critical aspects of the earthquake.

International perspectives resulting from the 1971 earthquake
This subtrack covers international perspectives from the 1971 San Fernando Earthquake. The event had a global influence on current state of earthquake practices and policy. Topics include any aspect on how the 1971 San Fernando Earthquake included international perspectives as related to the conference theme and goals. These may include the development of lifeline earthquake engineering; public policy related to earthquake hazards; earthquake research; earthquake mitigation, planning, design, and construction.

HAZARDS

This track covers hazards and their potential impacts on lifeline systems performances and community resilience. This track is not limited to aspects of the 1971 San Fernando Earthquake.

Earthquake geohazards (ground motions, liquefaction, landslides, fault rupture, and multi-earthquake hazard impacts on lifeline systems)
This subtrack covers earthquake geohazards. Topics may include methods for investigating geohazards and how to apply to community resilience and/or lifeline system planning, design, and construction; new studies on geohazards; case studies.

Tsunami
This subtrack covers tsunami and seiche hazards. Topics may include tsunami and seiche hazard research; effects of tsunami and seiche on lifeline systems and critical facilities; methods for tsunami evaluation and how to apply for lifeline system and community resilience assessment; case studies.

Warnings, alerts, and tools for managing hazards
This subtrack covers hazard warnings, alerts, and tools for managing hazards. Topics may include earthquake/tsunami early warning; ShakeAlert; strong motion instrumentation; how to apply for response and recovery of lifeline systems.

Multihazards (e.g., combined earthquake and non-earthquake hazards)
This subtrack covers multihazards. The emphasis for this subtrack is on how earthquake and non-earthquake hazards combine to impact lifeline systems and community resilience. Topics may include multiple hazard combinations in design; case studies of multiple hazards combining to impact lifeline systems or the greater community; effects of climate change on earthquake hazards (including tsunami and seiche).

Cascading hazards (hazmat, spills, etc.)
This subtrack covers cascading hazards. The emphasis on this subtrack is on how additional hazards cascade from or following an earthquake such as hazardous materials and other spills and fires following earthquake. Other topics may include dams and other critical facilities failing from or following earthquakes; floods following earthquake and earthquake-flood multihazard interaction.

Fire and flood hazards
This subtrack covers fire and flood hazards, which may occur independent of earthquakes. Fire and flood hazards continue to increase in magnitude and extent having devastating impacts on lifeline systems and communities. This track offers opportunity to present recent findings from events; research results; analysis, design, and construction methods related to fire and flood hazards; mitigation methods; other potential impacts of fire and flood hazards on lifeline systems and community resilience.

POST-EVENT INVESTIGATIONS & LONGITUDINAL STUDIES

This track covers post-event investigations and longitudinal studies. Topics may include reporting on past earthquake performance of lifeline systems and related community behaviors; disaster response and recovery case studies; changes in observed earthquake performance of lifeline systems since the 1971 San Fernando earthquake.

Performance of lifeline systems and critical facilities during major earthquake and tsunami events since 1971
This subtrack covers performance of lifeline systems and critical facilities during earthquake and tsunami events. Topics may include documented performances in the 2020 Puerto Rico Earthquake Sequence, 2019 Ridgecrest Earthquake Sequence, 2018 Hokkaido earthquake, 2017 Mexico earthquake, 2016 Kumamoto earthquake, or other recent events; description of lifeline systems performances in earlier earthquakes or other hazard strikes; longitudinal studies of lifeline system performance and recovery and community resilience from the 1971 San Fernando Earthquake or other events around the world.

Response, recovery, and/or reconstruction of lifeline systems.
This subtrack covers the response, recovery, and/or reconstruction of lifeline systems. Topics may include descriptions of these phases following the 1971 San Fernando Earthquake, 1994 Northridge earthquake; 2010-2011 Christchurch Earthquake Sequence; 2011 Great East Japan earthquake; any other earthquake or other major hazard strike providing sufficient information on the phased recovery of lifeline systems. Topics of special interest include the recovery and rebuild influenced by multiple events such as the hurricanes and earthquakes in Puerto Rico, earthquake sequences in Ridgecrest and Christchurch, and so on.

COMMUNITY RESILIENCE

This track covers community resilience. Topics may include the adaptation, transition, planning, design, pre-event mitigation, response, recovery, and rebuild to shocks and stressors.

Risk and resilience
This subtrack covers risk and resilience. Topics may include identification of hazard types and associated risks facing a community; the relationship between risk mitigation and resilience measures.

Social and economic systems
This subtrack covers social and economic systems. Topics may include categorization of social and economic systems; dependencies and interdependencies among social and economic systems; dependencies of social and economic systems on buildings and lifeline systems; how social and economic systems are affected during and after hazard events; modeling and resilience assessment of social and economic systems.

Performance objectives and metrics
This subtract covers performance objectives and metrics. Topics may include expected recovery goals for social and economic systems; definition of specific performance objectives and metrics for buildings and lifeline systems.

Vulnerability
This subtrack covers vulnerability assessment of a community. Topics may include vulnerability assessment of social and economic systems; vulnerability evaluation of lifeline systems; methodology and tools for vulnerability assessment.

Loss estimation
This subtrack covers direct and indirect loss estimation. Topics may include estimation of direct and indirect economic losses for social and economic systems; methodology and tools for estimating recovery time for buildings and lifeline systems; estimation of direct and indirect economic losses for lifeline systems.

Building clusters and how lifeline systems support community resilience
This subtrack covers how physical infrastructure supports community resilience. Topics may include strategies and recommendations for enhancing performance of buildings and lifeline systems; tools (including benefit-cost analysis) for justifying resilience investment measures.

Resilience planning programs
This subtrack covers resilience planning programs. Topics may include resilience planning process and guidelines; best practices and challenges associated with resilience planning; case studies or examples.

Implementation of resilience plans
This subtrack covers implementation aspects of resilience plans. Topics may include integration of resilience plan with other plans best practices, lessons learned, and challenges associated with implementation of resilience plan recommendations; case studies.

Continuity planning
This subtrack covers business continuity aspects of resilience planning. Topics may include new developments in continuity planning; consideration of dependencies and interdependencies in the continuity planning; best practices and lessons learned associated with continuity planning; case studies.

Response
This subtrack covers response aspect of a community. Topics may include emergency response; strategies for rapid response at community level and lifeline system level; use of emerging technologies to improve community response; programs and best practices for rapid response.

Recovery, restoration, rebuild
This subtrack covers recovery, restoration, and rebuild of a community after a major event. Topics may include post-event planning at a community and a lifeline system level; lessons learned, challenges and obstacles for rapid recovery and rebuild of a lifeline system; tools and strategies for justification of rebuilding better; case studies.

EMERGING & ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES

This track covers emerging and advanced technologies. Topics may include any type of emerging and advanced technology improving the resilience of lifeline systems and communities.

Resilient memory materials
This subtrack covers resilient memory materials. Topics may include the research, development, and application of resilient memory materials in engineered structures; how advanced materials can improve resilience of buildings and infrastructure systems.

System instrumentation and monitoring
This subtrack covers system instrumentation and monitoring. Topics include new developments in instrumentation applicable to monitoring different lifeline systems; real-time and near real-time monitoring; methods for using instrumentation in pre- and post-event decision making.

City-scale simulations
This subtrack covers city-scale simulations. Topics may include simulations of lifeline systems and communities in response to earthquakes and other hazards; interdependencies between social, economic and infrastructure systems; three-dimensional simulations of the natural and human-built systems; simulations used to improve pre-event decision support.

Machine learning and artificial intelligence
This subtrack covers artificial intelligence and machine learning. Topics may include the use of these technologies for improving methodologies for implementing resilience measures; application in engineering analysis methods; optimization; use in decision support systems.

Microgrids
This subtrack covers microgrids. Topics may include concepts for researching, developing and operationalizing microgrids in different lifeline systems; example use of microgrids improving lifeline systems and community resilience.

Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV)
This subtrack covers use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV’s). Topics may include use of UAV’s for post-event investigations; use for hazard identification and detection.

Remote sensing
This subtrack covers remote sensing. Topics may include descriptions of remote sensing technologies; example applications of remote sensing for resilience; post-event applications; use for hazard identification and detection.

Early warning systems
This subtrack covers early warning systems. Topics may include emerging and advanced technologies useful for creating and operationalizing early warning systems to improve lifeline system and community resilience; case studies and example applications using early warning systems; performance of early warning systems during actual events.

POLICY & GOVERNANCE

This track covers policy and governance for lifeline systems and community resilience. Topics may include policy and governance by the organizations who own and operate lifeline systems or for the public within the greater communities.

Public policy and resilience
This subtrack covers public policy and resilience. Topics may include public policy related to the design and operation of lifeline systems and/or for overall community resilience.

Land use planning
This subtrack covers land use planning. Topics may include best practices in land use planning for managing hazards, provision of lifeline system service, public safety or other related aspects.

Policy and governance for lifeline systems
This subtrack covers policy and governance for lifeline systems. Topics may include policy related to the design and operation of lifeline systems established within the organizations who own and operate them and interactions with the greater community leadership and regulatory authorities.

Guidelines, standards, codes for lifeline system performance
This subtrack covers guidelines, standards, and codes for lifeline system performance. Topics may include the need to develop guidelines, standards, and codes for lifeline systems; methods to develop resilient lifeline systems in the absence of guidelines standards, and codes; types of guidelines standards and codes needed to improve lifeline system resilience; current developments in guidelines, standards and codes; international guidelines, standards, and codes; and other related aspects.


 

Abstract Content Information

Authors are asked to provide a detailed description of what will be presented. This description should be approximately 100-400 words along with the following sub sections to be identified in the first submitted abstract for it to be considered. Questions the description should answer are listed but each section does not explicitly need to be included in the abstract.

Topic and Target Audience

  • Is this a research topic or and industry focused design talk?
  • What is the topic (clearly identify scope, methods, and results)?
  • Who is the target audience?

Audience Takeaways

  • What will the audience take away from your presentation? Try to list 3-5 specific items.
  • Explain how the audience will be able to use what they learn?
  • Does this provide a practical solution to a problem?

Evaluation for acceptance to the conference will be based on:

  • Technical content
  • Contribution to science and/or practice of lifeline engineering / community resilience
  • Quality of methodology / approach
  • Impact/advancement on Lifeline engineering / community resilience
  • Practical applications
  • Potential for a quality paper and/or presentation in the format you picked
  • Consistency with conference theme and goals

Submission Process and Deadlines

Phase One — Abstract Submission

  • Session leaders, authors and presenters submit abstracts (see guidelines above) for consideration by May 5 2020.
  • The Program Committee will review all abstracts based on the evaluation and acceptance criteria.
  • Notice of acceptance or declination will be sent to the authors by June 2, 2020

Phase Two — Draft Paper Submission

  • Authors submit draft papers between 6 and 12 pages long for consideration by August 16, 2020.
  • Draft papers must be formatted using MS Word according to ASCE guidelines. A sample document that may be used as a template is available at http://bit.ly/2R0IX1p
  • Track Leaders will arrange for a peer review for each draft paper based on the ASCE Guidelines for Peer Reviewers of Proceedings Papers, which is available at http://bit.ly/2N6Jyxq
  • Then, based on the review results, their own judgement, the evaluation criteria, and following ASCE paper format, Track Leaders will make preliminary decisions about whether or not to accept the draft paper.
  • Preliminary decisions about presentation formats (rescindable if the final paper is still not of an acceptable quality) may be made at this time, depending on the preference of the Program Committee.
  • Notice of these decisions, along with the review suggestions (presented anonymously), will be sent to the authors by September 28, 2020.

Phase Three — Final Paper Submission

  • Authors submit final versions of their approved draft papers for consideration by October 28, 2020.
  • Track Leaders will review the final papers for compliance with review suggestions made during draft phase.
  • Based on instructions from the Program Committee, session chairs will accept a specific number of papers for oral podium presentation at the conference. Other papers submitted to the session may be declined, or offered an alternative presentation type, so the conference goals can be optimally achieved. Final decisions about presentation formats will be made at this time. Notice of the final decision will be sent to the authors after all papers are received.

Proceedings and ASCE Copyright Transfer Agreement Requirement

Proceedings will be published online and made available to all conference registrants. The proceedings will be published and copyrighted by ASCE.

IMPORTANT: Submitting authors are required to sign the ASCE Copyright Transfer Agreement during the submission process, stating that 1) all authors listed on the manuscript are aware of their authorship status and qualify to be authors on the manuscript, 2) all content, figures (drawings, charts, photographs, etc.), and tables in the submitted work are either original work created by the authors listed on the manuscript or work for which permission to reuse has been obtained by the authors from the creator, and 3) the author transfers copyright to the ASCE. Further details are available at http://bit.ly/2DNB8FX


Notice of Registration Requirement

Every presentation, paper, and session awarded final acceptance into the conference technical program must have at least one person register for the conference by the speaker registration deadline. Each person designated to be part of an accepted session must also register by the speaker registration deadline.

Acceptance into the conference program and publication in the conference proceedings without registering for the conference and presenting is not possible. If you will not be able to attend, please do not submit an abstract. UCLA and ASCE do not reimburse or pay the presenter’s costs to attend the conference.

Please visit our abstract submition site to create account and create submission .

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